The Heron CLI us used to to manage every aspect of the topology lifecycle.

Deploying the heron CLI Executable

To use heron CLI, download the heron-client-install for your platfrom from release binaries and run the installation script. For example, if you have downloaded the version 0.13.5, you invoke the installation script as follows:

$ chmod +x heron-client-install-0.13.5-darwin.sh
$ ./heron-client-install-0.13.5-darwin.sh --user
Heron client installer
----------------------

Uncompressing......

Heron is now installed!

Make sure you have "/Users/$USER/bin" in your path.

See http://heronstreaming.io/docs/getting-started.html on how to use Heron!

....

Alternatively, generate a full Heron release and distribute the resulting heron CLI to all machines used to manage topologies.

Common CLI Args

All topology management commands (submit, activate, deactivate, restart, update and kill) take the following required arguments:

  • cluster — The name of the cluster where the command needs to be executed.

  • role — This represents the user or the group depending on deployment. If not provided, it defaults to the unix user.

  • env — This is a tag for including additional information (e.g) a topology can be tagged as PROD or DEVEL to indicate whether it is in production or development. If env is not provided, it is given a value default

cluster, role and env are specified as a single argument in the form of cluster/role/env (e.g) local/ads/PROD to refer the cluster local with role ads and the environment PROD. If you just want to specify cluster, the argument will be simply local.

Optional CLI Flags

CLI supports a common set of optional flags for all topology management commands (submit, activate, deactivate, restart, update and kill):

  • --config-path — Every heron cluster must provide a few configuration files that are kept under a directory named after the cluster. By default, when a cluster is provided in the command, it searches the conf directory for a directory with the cluster name. This flag enables you to specify a non standard directory to search for the cluster directory.

  • --config-property — Heron supports several configuration parameters that be overridden. These parameters are specified in the form of key=value.

  • --verbose — When this flag is provided, heron CLI prints logs that provide detailed information about the execution.

Below is an example topology management command that uses one of these flags:

$ heron activate --config-path ~/heronclusters devcluster/ads/PROD AckingTopology

Submitting a Topology

To run a topology in a Heron cluster, submit it using the submit command. Topologies can be submitted in either an activated (default) or deactivated state (more on activation and deactivation below).

Below is the basic syntax:

$ heron help submit
usage: heron submit [options] cluster/[role]/[env] topology-file-name topology-class-name [topology-args]

Required arguments:
  cluster/[role]/[env]  Cluster, role, and env to run topology
  topology-file-name    Topology jar/tar/zip file
  topology-class-name   Topology class name

Optional arguments:
  --config-path (a string; path to cluster config; default: "/Users/$USER/.heron/conf")
  --config-property (key=value; a config key and its value; default: [])
  --deploy-deactivated (a boolean; default: "false")
  --topology-main-jvm-property Define a system property to pass to java -D when running main.
  --verbose (a boolean; default: "false")

Arguments of the submit command:

  • cluster/[role]/[env] — The cluster where topology needs to be submitted, optionally taking the role and environment. For example,local/ads/PROD or just local

  • topology-file-name — The path of the file in which you’ve packaged the topology’s code. For Java topologies this will be a .jar file; for topologies in other languages (not yet supported), this could be a .tar file. For example, /path/to/topology/my-topology.jar

  • topology-class-name — The name of the class containing the main function for the topology. For example, com.example.topologies.MyTopology

  • topology-args (optional) — Arguments specific to the topology. You will need to supply additional args only if the main function for your topology requires them.

Example Topology Submission Command

Below is an example command that submits a topology to a cluster named devcluster with a main class named com.example.topologies.MyTopology packaged in my-topology.jar, along with the optional --config-path where the config for devcluster can be found:

$ heron submit --config-path ~/heronclusters devcluster /path/to/topology/my-topology.jar \
    com.example.topologies.MyTopology my-topology

Other Topology Submission Options

Flag Meaning
--deploy-deactivated If set, the topology is deployed in a deactivated state.
--topology-main-jvm-property Defines a system property to pass to java -D when running topology main

Activating a Topology

Topologies are submitted to the cluster in the activated state by default. To activate a deactivated topology use the activate command. Below is the basic syntax:

$ heron help activate
usage: heron activate [options] cluster/[role]/[env] topology-name

Required arguments:
  cluster/[role]/[env]  Cluster, role, and env to run topology
  topology-name         Name of the topology

Optional arguments:
  --config-path (a string; path to cluster config; default: "/Users/$USER/.heron/conf")
  --config-property (key=value; a config key and its value; default: [])

Arguments of the activate command:

  • cluster/[role]/[env] — The cluster where topology needs to be submitted, optionally taking the role and environment. For exampple, local/ads/PROD or just local

  • topology-name — The name of the already-submitted topology that you’d like to activate.

Example Topology Activation Command

$ heron activate local/ads/PROD my-topology

Deactivating a Topology

You can deactivate a running topology at any time using the deactivate command. Here’s the basic syntax:

$ heron help deactivate
usage: heron deactivate [options] cluster/[role]/[env] topology-name

Required arguments:
  cluster/[role]/[env]  Cluster, role, and env to run topology
  topology-name         Name of the topology

Optional arguments:
  --config-path (a string; path to cluster config; default: "/Users/kramasamy/.heron/conf")
  --config-property (key=value; a config key and its value; default: [])
  --verbose (a boolean; default: "false")

Arguments of the deactivate command:

  • cluster/[role]/[env] — The cluster where topology needs to be submitted, optionally taking the role and environment. For example, local/ads/PROD or just local

  • topology-name — The name of the topology that you’d like to deactivate.

Restarting a Topology

You can restart a deactivated topology using the restart command (assuming that the topology has not yet been killed, i.e. removed from the cluster).

$ heron help restart
usage: heron restart [options] cluster/[role]/[env] topology-name [container-id]

Required arguments:
  cluster/[role]/[env]  Cluster, role, and env to run topology
  topology-name         Name of the topology
  container-id          Identifier of the container to be restarted

Optional arguments:
  --config-path (a string; path to cluster config; default: "/Users/kramasamy/.heron/conf")
  --config-property (key=value; a config key and its value; default: [])
  --verbose (a boolean; default: "false")

Arguments of the restart command:

  • cluster/[role]/[env] — The cluster where topology needs to be submitted, optionally taking the role and environment. For example, local/ads/PROD or just local

  • topology-name — The name of the topology that you’d like to restart.

  • container-id (optional) — This enables you to specify the container ID to be restarted if you want to restart only a specific container of the topology.

Example Topology Restart Command

$ heron restart local/ads/PROD my-topology

Updating a Topology

You can update the parallelism of any of the components of a deployed topology using the update command.

$ heron help update
usage: heron update [options] cluster/[role]/[env] <topology-name> --component-parallelism <name:value>

Required arguments:
  cluster/[role]/[env]  Cluster, role, and environment to run topology
  topology-name         Name of the topology

Optional arguments:
  --component-parallelism COMPONENT_PARALLELISM
                        Component name and the new parallelism value colon-
                        delimited: [component_name]:[parallelism]
  --config-path (a string; path to cluster config; default: "/Users/billg/.heron/conf")
  --config-property (key=value; a config key and its value; default: [])
  --verbose (a boolean; default: "false")

Arguments of the update command include cluster/[role]/[env] and topology-name as well as:

  • –component-parallelism — This argument can be included multiple times to change the parallelism of components in the deployed topology.

Example Topology Update Command

$ heron update local/ads/PROD my-topology \
  --component-parallelism=my-spout:2 \
  --component-parallelism=my-bolt:4

Killing a Topology

If you’ve submitted a topology to your Heron cluster and would like to remove knowledge of the topology entirely, you can remove it using the kill command. Here’s the basic syntax:

$ heron kill <killer-overrides> <topology>

Arguments of the kill command:

  • cluster/[role]/[env] — The cluster where topology needs to be submitted, optionally taking the role and environment. For example, local/ads/PROD or just local

  • topology-name — The name of the topology that you’d like to kill.

Example Topology Kill Command

$ heron kill local my-topology

Heron CLI configuration

When using the Heron CLI tool to interact with Heron clusters, there are two ways to provide configuration for the tool:

  • Via command-line flags, such as --service-url
  • Using the heron config interface, which enables you to set, unset, and list configs in the local filesystem

Available parameters

The following parameters can currently be set using the heron config interface:

Parameter Description Corresponding CLI flag
service_url The service URL for the Heron cluster --service-url

Set configuration

You can set a config using the set command. Here’s an example:

$ heron config us-west-staging set service_url http://us-west.staging.example.com:9000

Unset configuration

You can remove a parameter using the unset command. Here’s an example:

$ heron config apac-australia unset service_url

List configuration

You can list all of the CLI configs for a Heron cluster using the list command. This will return the configs as a list of parameter = value pairs. Here’s an example:

$ heron config local list
service_url = http://localhost:9000

Configuration example

Let’s say that you need to interact with a Heron cluster called apac-japan-staging which has a service URL of http://apac-japan.staging.example.com:9000. If you specified the service URL via CLI flags, you’d need to set the flag every time you perform an operation involving that cluster:

$ heron deactivate apac-japan-staging MyTopology \
  --service-url http://apac-japan.staging.example.com:9000

Using heron config, however, you could set the service URL for that cluster once and for all:

$ heron config apac-japan-staging set service_url http://apac-japan.staging.example.com:9000
$ heron deactivate apac-japan-staging MyTopology

Other Commands

Version

Run the version command at any time to see which version of heron you’re using:

$ heron version
heron.build.version : 0.13.5
heron.build.time : Wed May 11 23:49:00 PDT 2016
heron.build.timestamp : 1463035740000
heron.build.host : mbp-machine
heron.build.user : userwhobuilt
INFO: Elapsed time: 0.000s.